Monday, April 25, 2016

Got My First Rejection For My New Manuscript!!

This week I've been querying, and of course, that comes with the instant joy of rejection.  I'll be honest though, there were several things that struck me as unusual about this rejection.  First of all, she had reviewed it within three days of submission.  Kudos to her, that's pretty quick.  However, there were some other unusual things within the text.  Behold:


Dear Chris, <normal
Thank you so much for thinking of me for <Manuscript Title Redacted>, which I was happy to see.  <unusual Unfortunately, I'm afraid it's not a good fit for me, so I must pass. <normal  I'm so sorry. <unusual
Wishing you all the best,
Agentface <normal

So here's what strikes me.  I've been rejected a couple times before.  No one mentions they are happy to see something.  Agent time is precious, and it seems like a frivolous sentence.  It could be the form she uses, but it's not something I'm used to seeing.  It also could indicates that she read the MS, which is cool.  A lot of agents don't take the time, so anything indicative of that is positive.  The more agent eyes in front of your work, the better, rejection or no.

Also saying, "I'm so sorry" seems out of place.  It's almost as though they thought about it, and were not 100% on their decision.  Normally "I'm going to pass" suffices and agent is done.  So it made me curious. 

Both of these things could just be nothing.  The agent might use those statements for everyone.  I fully intend to query something else entirely in a week to find out.  However, I'm choosing to read the positive tea leaves on this one and keep plugging away at querying this project with maybe a bit more focused approach in terms of agent preferences.

How about you guys?  Which agent/publisher responses caught your eye? 

-Chris 

2 comments:

  1. I'm sorry is unusual. I've never seen it.

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  2. Right? The other part wasn't that offsetting, but I was like, sorry? I forgive you. This time... This time! lol.

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